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STRUCTURAL SEPARATION AND FAMILY CHANGE : AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE IMMIGRANT INDIAN AND PAKISTANI COMMUNITY OF SASKATOON, CANADA

CHAUDRY M. SIDDIQUE
International Review of Modern Sociology
Vol. 7, No. 1 (January-June 1977), pp. 13-34
Published by: International Journals
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23565715
Page Count: 22
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
STRUCTURAL SEPARATION AND FAMILY CHANGE : AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE IMMIGRANT INDIAN AND PAKISTANI COMMUNITY OF SASKATOON, CANADA
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Abstract

Partial findings from a larger study of the immigrant Indian and Pakistani families of Saskatoon are presented in this paper. Two aspects of family interaction, division of labor and decision-making, are extensively, studied. The direction of change is pointed out by comparing, wherever possible, the interaction pattern emerging in the immigrant community with the "Canadian Patterns" and with those which are shown to exist in contemporary India and Pakistan. The observed patterns seem to indicate an "intermediate level of conformity"—showing a continuity of traditional patterns along with an adoption of new ones. Various explanations of the type of change occurring in the immigrant family are explored. It is suggested that the fact of migration, as an instance of geographic mobility, has produced an important initial condition of change by inducing structural separation of the immigrant family from its larger kin networks. Vertical social mobility and husband's attainment of higher education from Western schools constitute a set of rather more precipitating conditions which may further facilitate the process of change. An increasing length of stay in Canada and other Western countries of these immigrant families accounts for the extent to which their emerging patterns are similar to the Canadian patterns. On the other hand, the Canadian society's emphasis on "ethnic pluralism" and the immigrant wives' lesser experience of living abroad and low integration in this new cultural setting seem to explain the persistence of traditional modes of interaction. These findings are tentative at best and indicate a need for further research on this immigrant community.

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