Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Prayer in the Vernacular During the Middle Ages / התפילה והפיוט בלשון-לעז בימי-הביניים

פרי חירם, ח. פרי (פלאום) and H. Peri (Pflaum)
Tarbiẕ / תרביץ
כרך כד‎, חוברת ד‎ (תמוז תשט"ו), pp. 426-440
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23588459
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Prayer in the Vernacular During the Middle Ages / התפילה והפיוט בלשון-לעז בימי-הביניים
Preview not available

Abstract

The custom of translating the Scriptural readings and synagogue prayers into the vernacular for those who did not understand Hebrew is found in various periods in different countries. The Mishnah permits translation, and many rabbis from the Gaonic period through the 9th century expressed their approval of this custom. Such indeed was the practice as well. There are attestations in different communities to the use of the vernacular for the Scriptural readings and prayers. This article gives a detailed list of ancient prayer books in the vernacular, according to language: Aramaic, ancient Greek, Arabic, Persian, middle and new Greek, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalonian, Provençal, French, and German. From this it can be learned that prayers in translation from as early as the 13th century have been preserved. A Judeo-French text from the same period has been preserved in manuscript in Heidelberg (to be published shortly by the author). It is distinguished by the fact that it is not simply a collection of piyyutim and isolated prayers, but is indeed a remnant of a full prayer book. The material dealt with in the article includes: Halakhik citations beginning with the Mishnah and concluding with the latest of the codifiers; testimony from various countries regarding the use of the vernacular for prayer and Scriptural reading; a list of the piyyutim and prayers which have been preserved. All these prove that at all times there existed Jewish communities where the vernacular held a place beside the Hebrew for the ignorant and women. This use of the vernacular made it possible to have all parts of the community participate in the Divine service. An appendix to the article deals with references in Talmudic literature which show opposition to permitting the vernacular for the reading of the Scriptures and public prayer. It is shown that two schools of thought existed during the Talmudic period with reference to the permission of the vernacular.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[426]
    [426]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440