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Subject and Predicate Order in Ben Yehuda's Hebrew and the Hebrew of Contemporary Journalism / סדר נושא ונשוא בלשון אליעזר בן-יהודה ובלשון עיתונית בימינו

חנה ב' שגיא and Hanna B. Saggi
Tarbiẕ / תרביץ
כרך נא‎, חוברת ג‎ (ניסן-סיון תשמ"ב), pp. 510-516
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23595795
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Subject and Predicate Order in Ben Yehuda's Hebrew and the Hebrew of Contemporary Journalism / סדר נושא ונשוא בלשון אליעזר בן-יהודה ובלשון עיתונית בימינו
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Abstract

There are no established rules for subject and predicate order in the Hebrew language. However, there have been attempts by scholars to establish such rules, based primarily on Biblical Hebrew. The author investigated this issue in Eliezer Ben Yehuda's journalistic Hebrew, as well as in contemporary journalistic Hebrew. From this investigation there emerged two main conclusions: (1) There are no differences in principle between Eliezer Ben Yehuda's subject and predicate order, and that of contemporary journalistic Hebrew. (2) Various forms of subject and predicate order that are frequently used in ancient Hebrew sources (mainly Biblical Hebrew) survive almost in the same proportion in Eliezer Ben Yehuda's Hebrew as well as in contemporary journalistic Hebrew. Those forms of subject and predicate order that appear less frequently in the ancient Hebrew language (although considered normative forms by some scholars) have not been uniformly incorporated by Ben Yehuda or in contemporary journalistic Hebrew. In fact, some of these forms are now (in present day journalistic Hebrew) rather seldomly used (e.g. predicate-verb precedes the subject in a clause).

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