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Prolactin Synthesized and Secreted by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: An Autocrine Growth Factor for Lymphoproliferation

P. Sabharwal, R. Glaser, W. Lafuse, S. Varma, Q. Liu, S. Arkins, R. Kooijman, L. Kutz, K. W. Kelley and W. B. Malarkey
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 89, No. 16 (Aug. 15, 1992), pp. 7713-7716
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2360161
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Prolactin Synthesized and Secreted by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: An Autocrine Growth Factor for Lymphoproliferation
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Abstract

Prolactin has been shown to have an immunoregulatory role in the rodent immune response. A prolactin-like molecule has also been found in mouse splenocytes and a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line. We have evaluated whether human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) synthesize and/or secrete prolactin. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate a 276-base-pair prolactin product from human PBMCs, and Southern blot analysis confirmed that it was related to prolactin. Western blotting using a polyclonal antibody to prolactin indicated that cell extracts prepared from human PBMCs contained a high molecular mass (60-kDa) immunoreactive prolactin. To determine whether this PBMC prolactin was being secreted, we developed a highly sensitive and specific hormonal enzyme-linked immunoplaque assay. With this assay, we were able to detect human prolactin secretion from concanavalin A (Con A)- or phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBMCs but not from unstimulated PBMCs. We next sought to determine whether this secreted prolactin could function as an autocrine growth factor in lymphoproliferation. We observed that anti-human prolactin antiserum significantly inhibited human PBMC proliferation in response to Con A or phytohemagglutinin. We conclude that a prolactin-like molecule is synthesized and secreted by human PBMCs and that it functions in an autocrine manner as a growth factor for lymphoproliferation.

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