Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Diversity and ecology of spider assemblages of a Mediterranean wetland complex

Sascha Buchholz and Maria Schröder
The Journal of Arachnology
Vol. 41, No. 3 (2013), pp. 364-373
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23610254
Page Count: 10
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Diversity and ecology of spider assemblages of a Mediterranean wetland complex
Preview not available

Abstract

Wetland complexes in Mediterranean deltas play an important ecological role, as they harbor a diverse flora and fauna with numerous specialized species. Intensification and expansion of agricultural land use, as well as increasing withdrawal of water over the past decades, has led to considerable habitat loss in many places. Although studies from temperate Europe have already demonstrated the conservation needs of wetlands, analogous data for the Mediterranean region are very scarce. The present paper analyzes spider assemblages of the Aladjagiola wetland complex and provides ecological descriptions of diversity patterns and assemblage structures. We aim to provide the first ecological descriptions of several species and effective data sets to characterize the ecological status of the wetland habitats investigated. Spiders were collected by pitfall trapping from April to July 2008 in seven habitat types: pseudo-maquis, dry grassland (short growth), dry grassland (long growth), fringes, reed belts, humid grassland and fallow land. Diversity (alpha and functional) and evenness were both found to be lowest in humid habitat types. Community structure was analyzed by non-metric multidimensional scaling. Humid habitat types harbored a distinct species assemblage comprising many hygrophilic species that could clearly be separated from all other habitat types. By means of generalized linear models, habitat preferences of numerous xerophlic, hygrophilic and photophilic species could be assessed. Our study demonstrated that especially humid habitat types are worth protecting.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366
  • Thumbnail: Page 
367
    367
  • Thumbnail: Page 
368
    368
  • Thumbnail: Page 
369
    369
  • Thumbnail: Page 
370
    370
  • Thumbnail: Page 
371
    371
  • Thumbnail: Page 
372
    372
  • Thumbnail: Page 
373
    373
Part of Sustainability