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LES ROUTES DE L'AISNE ET DE LA SARTHE ENTRE LINEARITE ET COMPLEMENTARITE, 1812-1850

Jean-Marcel GOGER
Histoire, Économie et Société
Vol. 9, No. 1, LES TRANSPORTS (1er trimestre 1990), pp. 19-38
Published by: Armand Colin
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23610886
Page Count: 20
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
LES ROUTES DE L'AISNE ET DE LA SARTHE ENTRE LINEARITE ET COMPLEMENTARITE, 1812-1850
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Abstract

En 1812, les grandes routes de l'Aisne et de la Sarthe sont tronçonnées et affligées de points noirs. Les chemins de traverse, rebaptisés départementales, ne reçoivent que des crédits marginaux, tandis que chaque commune cailloute grossièrement sa vicinalité. En 1850, les grandes nationales sont correctement entretenues, mais elles ne correspondent plus aux nouvelles exigences du roulage. Au contraire, les départementales et les chemins de grande vicinalité offrent un achèvement rationnel au trafic. La vigueur des batelleries et l'apparition du chemin de fer ébauchent une nouvelle géographie des flux routiers, avec la polarisation de charrois courts par les embarcadères. In 1812, the highways of the «Aisne» and «Sarthe» departments are made up of different sections and often interrupted by dangerous passages. A very limited amount of money is devoted to the «departementales» (a new name for traditional shortcuts), whereas each «commune» roughly takes care of its own local paths. In 1850, the main highways are correctly looked after, but they do not meet the new needs of fast transport. On the contrary, the «departementales» and the major country lanes perfectly meet the new economic needs. The soaring of boat-transport and the emergence of railways give a new face to the geography of road-transport, soon to be limited to short distances around fluvial harbours and railways stations.

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