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The Conflict between the Princes Savoy and the Pope Concerning the Jewish Bankers from Portugal (1573—1581) / הסכסוך בין נסיכי סאבויה ובין האפיפיור בעניין הבנקאים היהודים מפורטוגל (1573–1581)

יהושע פואה and Y. S. Foa
Eretz-Israel: Archaeological, Historical and Geographical Studies / ארץ-ישראל: מחקרים בידיעת הארץ ועתיקותיה
Vol. ג‎, DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF M.D.U. CASSUTO 1883-1951 / מוקדש לזכרו של משה דוד קאסוטו‎ (1954 / תשי"ד), pp. 240-243
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23614049
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Conflict between the Princes Savoy and the Pope Concerning the Jewish Bankers from Portugal (1573—1581) / הסכסוך בין נסיכי סאבויה ובין האפיפיור בעניין הבנקאים היהודים מפורטוגל (1573–1581)
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Abstract

Jewish settlement in Piedmont, then ruled by dukes from the House of Savoy, began in the 14th century. In 1430, the duke formally granted the Jews protection. In 1560, an expulsion order was issued against them, which was however never executed, since the Jews were vital to the state as suppliers of money. An agreement concluded between the duke and the Jews in 1564 — and thereafter regularly renewed until the French Revolution — granted privileges to bankers, and a period of flourishing Jewish banking activity was thereby ushered in. In 1572, Piedmont admitted a group of Jewish bankers from Portugal and rejected the Pope's protest on the plea of economic necessity. A decree of expulsion wrested from the duke against those who were proved to be backsliding conversos seems not to have been implemented; on the contrary, further Portuguese were received. The Portuguese Jews enjoyed exemption from taxes imposed on the veteran Jewish population, and jurisdiction over them was exercised by a special "conservatore". In 1581, however, a new expulsion decree was issued, and this time, barring a few exceptions, the Portuguese had to leave the country.

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