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Intergenerational Interests, Uncertainty and Discrimination — II: An Empirical Analysis of the Process of Declining Child Sex Ratios in India

Mattias Larsen, Neelambar Hatti and Pernille Gooch
Sociological Bulletin
Vol. 57, No. 2 (May-August 2008), pp. 173-192
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23620786
Page Count: 20
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Intergenerational Interests, Uncertainty and Discrimination — II: An Empirical Analysis of the Process of Declining Child Sex Ratios in India
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Abstract

This article is an empirical analysis of the problem of declining child sex ratios in India. The rapid transformation of the social and economic fabric in India is altering the institution of the family, as the young become increasingly disembedded from customary social relations. Case studies in Karnataka and Uttaranchal show how this transformation has lead to differing intergenerational interests, thereby increasing parental uncertainty about the future. The uncertainty experienced by the older generation concerns apprehensions about future socioeconomic obligations and the younger generation becoming disembedded from those intergenerational interests. It is in the face of this uncertainty that the situational context of the social devices transmitted through centuries of gendered prescriptions is fallen back upon and receives renewed importance. This context is constituted by highly gendered norms wherein daughter discrimination is legitimised and rationalised.

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