Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Target-Derived Influences on Axon Growth Modes in Cultures of Trigeminal Neurons

Reha S. Erzurumlu, Sonal Jhaveri, Hiroshi Takahashi and Ronald D. G. McKay
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 90, No. 15 (Aug. 1, 1993), pp. 7235-7239
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2362687
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Target-Derived Influences on Axon Growth Modes in Cultures of Trigeminal Neurons
Preview not available

Abstract

Cellular and molecular signals involved in axon elongation versus collateral and arbor formation may be intrinsic to developing neurons, or they may derive from targets. To identify signals regulating axon growth modes, we have developed a culture system in which trigeminal ganglion cells are challenged by various target tissues. Embryonic day 15 (E15) rat trigeminal ganglion explants were placed between peripheral (vibrissa pad) and central nervous system targets. Normally, bipolar trigeminal ganglion cells extend one process to the vibrissa pad and another to the brainstem trigeminal complex. Under coculture conditions, the peripheral processes invade the vibrissa pad explants and form a characteristic circumfollicular pattern. Central processes of E15 ganglion cells invade many, but not all, central nervous system tissues. In isochronic (E15) central nervous system explants such as brainstem, olfactory bulb, or neocortex, these central processes elongate and form a "tract" but have virtually no arbors. However, in more mature targets (e.g., a section from postnatal brainstem or neocortex), they form arbors instead of a tract. We conclude from these observations that whether trigeminal axons elongate to form a tract, or whether they begin to arborize, is dictated by the target tissue and not by an intrinsic developmental program of the ganglion cell body. The explant coculture system is an excellent model for analysis of the molecular basis of neuron-target interactions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
7235
    7235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7236
    7236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7237
    7237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7238
    7238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7239
    7239