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Did the City of Dor Serve as the Capital of an Assyrian Province? / האם הייתה דור מרכז שלטון של פחווה אשורית?

נדב נאמן and Nadav Na'aman
Eretz-Israel: Archaeological, Historical and Geographical Studies / ארץ-ישראל: מחקרים בידיעת הארץ ועתיקותיה
Vol. כט‎, EPHRAIM STERN VOLUME / ספר אפרים שטרן‎ (2009 / תשס"ט), pp. 310-317
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23631333
Page Count: 8
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Did the City of Dor Serve as the Capital of an Assyrian Province? / האם הייתה דור מרכז שלטון של פחווה אשורית?
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Abstract

The article discusses the status of the city of Dor under the Assyrian empire. Dor was annexed by the Assyrians in 732 BCE, and many scholars believe that it was the capital of a separate province that encompassed the coastal area between Mount Carmel in the north and the Yarkon River in the south. Three kinds of evidence are analyzed in detail: the textual evidence, the results of the archaeological excavations conducted at the site, and the status of Dor along the axis of time (the longue durée). The textual and the archaeological evidence reveal the importance of Dor's harbor for the Assyrians and its importance in the maritime trade along the east coast of the Mediterranean in the seventh century BCE, but provide no decisive evidence about its place in the Assyrian province system. An examination of the status of Dor during the eleventh—fifth centuries BCE indicates that it was always the capital of a political entity, or of a distinct district within the larger province system. The analysis opens the door to the possibility that Dor was the capital of a separate Assyrian province, but more evidence is needed to decide whether this was indeed the case, or if Dor was a port in the confines of the province of Megiddo.

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