Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A BUILT STONE ALIGNMENT ASSOCIATED WITH AN LSA ARTEFACT ASSEMBLAGE ON MIA FARM, MIDRAND, SOUTH AFRICA

REVIL J. MASON
The South African Archaeological Bulletin
Vol. 67, No. 196 (DECEMBER 2012), pp. 214-230
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23631461
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A BUILT STONE ALIGNMENT ASSOCIATED WITH AN LSA ARTEFACT ASSEMBLAGE ON MIA FARM, MIDRAND, SOUTH AFRICA
Preview not available

Abstract

In 1996, Alan Dawson of the Midrand Council commissioned me to report on heritage sites within Midrand. I had recorded Glenferness in the Bulletin of 1950, and had worked on Boulders, a Granite Tor site surrounded by the Midrand Shopping Mall. The third site I worked on was at Mia Farm on the Midrand—Johannesburg border, miraculously preserved within 150 m of the N1-Allandale Highway. All three sites were occupied by enterprising early Late Stone Age people about 12 000 BP. Mia, the subject of this paper, was located on the upper slopes of the Eastern Jukskei River Valley. It was exceptional in its preservation of a built shelter anchor manuport alignment. Informed by the research of Carl Anhaeusser on dykes in the Mia area in the 1970s, I explain Mia as an early Late Stone Age shelter built using manuports from the Allandale Dyke. The shelter enabled two people to exploit early morning predator kills on the nearby Jukskei Valley slope and to store the food within the safety of a built shelter. In 2007, Professor Anhaeusser secured a Google Earth image showing the fenced site encircled by a go-cart track. Within a year, road development wiped out the Mia site. Fortunately, the National Cultural History Museum in Pretoria agreed to curate the Mia collection.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230