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Binocular Disparity Discrimination in Human Cerebral Cortex: Functional Anatomy by Positron Emission Tomography

Balazs Gulyas and Per E. Roland
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 91, No. 4 (Feb. 15, 1994), pp. 1239-1243
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2364074
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Binocular Disparity Discrimination in Human Cerebral Cortex: Functional Anatomy by Positron Emission Tomography
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Abstract

Neurobiological studies in higher primates indicate that the processing of stereoscopic information takes place at early levels in the visual cortex. To map the anatomical structures in the human brain participating in pure stereopsis based upon binocular disparity, we measured with positron emission tomography the changes in regional cerebral blood flow as an indicator of metabolic activity in 10 healthy young men during visual discrimination of binocular disparity. The data demonstrate that the discrimination of pure stereoptic disparity information takes place in the polar striate cortex and the neighboring peristriate cortices, as well as in the parietal lobe, the prefrontal cortex, and the cerebellum. The discrimination of stereoscopic depth is dependent on a network composed of multiple functional fields localized in occipital- and parietal-lobe visual areas as well as in the dorsolateral and mesial prefrontal cortex. The findings support the importance of coactivated occipitoparietal visual areas in the processing and analysis of binocular depth information in humans.

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