Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Use of Genetic Recombination as a Reporter of Gene Expression

Andrew Camilli, David T. Beattie and John J. Mekalanos
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 91, No. 7 (Mar. 29, 1994), pp. 2634-2638
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2364289
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Use of Genetic Recombination as a Reporter of Gene Expression
Preview not available

Abstract

An understanding of the patterns of gene expression in response to specific environmental signals can yield insight into a variety of complex biological systems such as microbial-host interactions, developmental cycles, cellular differentiation, ontogeny, etc. To extend the utility of the reporter gene fusion approach to such studies, we have constructed a gene expression reporter cassette that permits the generation of transcriptional fusions to tnpR encoding resolvase, a site-specific recombinase of the transposable element γδ. Induction of the transcriptional fusions results in production of resolvase, which in turn, catalyzes excision of a linked tetracycline-resistance reporter gene flanked by direct repeats of res, the DNA sequences at which resolvase functions. The loss of tetracycline resistance in descendant bacteria serves as a permanent and heritable marker of prior gene expression. This gene fusion approach will allow us to assay the induction of gene expression in as few as one cell. Additionally, gene expression can be assayed at a later time and/or different place from the inducing environment facilitating the study of gene expression in complex environments such as animal tissues.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
2634
    2634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2635
    2635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2636
    2636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2637
    2637
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2638
    2638