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Genetic relationships of Japanese and Indian mulberry (Morus spp.) genotypes revealed by DNA fingerprinting

K. Vijayan
Plant Systematics and Evolution
Vol. 243, No. 3/4 (January 2004), pp. 221-232
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23645372
Page Count: 12
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Genetic relationships of Japanese and Indian mulberry (Morus spp.) genotypes revealed by DNA fingerprinting
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Abstract

Mulberry (Morus spp.), a deciduous tree, originated at the foothills of the Himalayas and is used in sericulture for its leaf to feed the silkworm Bombyx mori L. Species differentiation among the genotypes of the genus Morus has never been out of debate as inter-specific hybridization events are often fertile. In the present study attempts were made to elucidate the genetic relationships among 18 mulberry genotypes collected from India and Japan using 15 Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and 15 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers. The ISSR primers generated 81.13% polymorphism while the RAPDs generated 71.78% polymorphism. The polymorphic index of the primers identified UBC-812, UBC-826, UBC827, UBC-881, OPA-01, OPA-02, OPA-04 and OPH-17 as informative primers in mulberry. The genetic similarity coefficients and the dendrograms showed considerable genetic similarity among the genotypes. However, using the DNA markers, these genotypes were discriminated into two major groups in accordance with their geographic origin and species status. Distribution of the genotypes on a two-dimensional figure on the basis of the ALSCAL algorithm using Euclidean distance further confirmed the genetic divergence between these two groups. From the study it can be concluded that though morphologically Japanese and Indian mulberry genotypes show little divergence, genetic analysis using DNA markers could unravel significant genetic variation between these two groups. Similarly, while the species status of Japanese mulberry genotypes agrees with the genetic analysis, the same does not apply to Indian genotypes, in agreement with many earlier reports. The information generated in this study is of much use for taxonomical grouping and also for utilization in breeding and conservation programs.

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