Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Anomalous Reactions to Social Pressure of Israeli and Soviet Children Raised in Family Versus Collective Settings / תגובות חריגות ללחץ חברתי של ילדים ישראליים וסובייטיים שגדלו במסגרת משפחתם לעומת מסגרת קולקטיבית

רון שובל, סופי קב-ונקי, אורי ברונפנברנר, אדוארד ס. דברו, אליזבט קיילי, Ron Shouval, Sophie Kav Venaki, Urie Bronfenbrenner, Edward C. Devereux and Elizabeth Kiely
Megamot / מגמות
Vol. כ"ה‎, No. 2 (כסלו תש"ם / דצמבר 1979), pp. 167-184
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23651689
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Anomalous Reactions to Social Pressure of Israeli and Soviet Children Raised in Family Versus Collective Settings / תגובות חריגות ללחץ חברתי של ילדים ישראליים וסובייטיים שגדלו במסגרת משפחתם לעומת מסגרת קולקטיבית
Preview not available

Abstract

This experimental investigates reaction to social pressure among Israeli (N = 400) and Soviet (N = 353) 12-year-olds brought up in family versus collective settings (kibbutz in Israel, boarding school in the U.S.S.R.). Soviet children showed higher levels of conformity than their Israeli age-mates. Cultural differences, sex differences, and the effect of threatened social exposure were greater for youngsters raised in collective settings than for those brought up in their own homes. Kibbutz-reared children did not react in the same way as products of Soviet group upbringing. Israeli children generally did resemble their Soviet age-mates in reacting similarly to pressure from peers versus adults, but they differed sharply from their Soviet counterparts, as well as from children from ten other countries, in giving their most moral responses when neither their parents nor their friends would know of their action.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[167]
    [167]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172
  • Thumbnail: Page 
173
    173
  • Thumbnail: Page 
174
    174
  • Thumbnail: Page 
175
    175
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184