Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The stress and coping of uprooted settlers: Conclusions and recommendations based on the Yamit experience / לחץ והתמודדות אצל מפוני חבל ימית: מסקנות והמלצות

יוסף טוביאנה, נח מילגרם, הרצל פלח, Yosef Toubiana, Noach Milgram and Herzl Falach
Megamot / מגמות
Vol. ל"א‎, No. 1 (ניסן תשמ"ח / אפריל 1988), pp. 65-82
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23655826
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The stress and coping of uprooted settlers: Conclusions and recommendations based on the Yamit experience / לחץ והתמודדות אצל מפוני חבל ימית: מסקנות והמלצות
Preview not available

Abstract

The research literature indicates that being uprooted from one's home and being forced to resettle elsewhere is a highly upsetting experience with adverse consequences for mental health. Most research on uprooting deals with impoverished people, usually ethnic minority members, often elderly. This paper deals with an uprooting experience of a middle class, well established group — the former Israeli settlers of the Yamit region. The settlers' stress reactions were examined during the waiting period (prior to evacuation) and the period immediately after the evacuation with reference to hypothesized stressresistant variables: Group cohesiveness, pre-evacuation planning, the aim of settling in the region to begin with, and the support systems utilized. Data based on questionnaires filled out by 100 former settlers one month after the evacuation, indicated the following: (1) Veteran settlers reported high levels of stress reactions (anxiety, depression, anger, somatic manifestations) during the highly tense waiting period (1979-1982), followed by a marked reduction one month after the evacuation and razing of Yamit. As a group, the veteran settlers reported a strong sense of alienation and rejection at the hands of society. (2) Newer settlers who had come to Yamit specifically to prevent the return of the region to Egypt were free of symptomatology. They did not interpret the success or failure of their efforts by the standards commonly applied by outsiders. (3) Veteran settlers whose aims of settling in the region were ideological were more upset by the crisis than veteran settlers whose aims were not ideological. (4) Both veteran and new settlers reported that the nuclear family, their belief system, and group cohesiveness constituted very helpful support systems. The quality of leadership was also highly helpful to the new settlers. The paper suggests that the government, the media, and especially the mental health professions did not wholly appreciate the stressful predicament of the Yamit settlers. The authors offer recommendations to reduce the likelihood of professional insensitivity or ideological antipathy toward the victims of largescale ideological crises. They suggest that the pattern of insensitivity directed toward the Yamit settlers now appears to be directed toward settlers in Judea, Samaria, and Gaza. Readers are invited to comment on the professional and ethical issues raised.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[65]
    [65]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82