Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN THE IMPERIAL HISTORIOGRAPHY OF SÜLEYMAN THE MAGNIFICENT: AN EVALUATION OF NİŞANCI CELĀLZĀDE'S VIEW

Mehmet Şakir Yilmaz
Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Vol. 60, No. 4 (December 2007), pp. 427-445
Published by: Akadémiai Kiadó
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23658767
Page Count: 19
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN THE IMPERIAL HISTORIOGRAPHY OF SÜLEYMAN THE MAGNIFICENT: AN EVALUATION OF NİŞANCI CELĀLZĀDE'S VIEW
Preview not available

Abstract

Celālzāde Mustafa Çelebi's Tabakātu'l-Memālik ve Derecātu'l-Mesālik is one of the invaluable primary sources dealing with the reign of Süleyman the Magnificent (1520—1566). Its author, Celālzāde Mustafa (d. 1567), was a distinguished Nişancı (head of the imperial chancery), who is credited with the codification of Ottoman laws under Süleyman the Magnificent. Celālzāde was the main official responsible for the "true" representation of the Ottoman sultan for over 35 years during his long career in the sultan's service. This paper aims to demonstrate that an official definition of justice was articulated and propagated in the Tobakāt in order to meet the contemporary requirements of the Ottoman administration, i.e. a powerful central authority. With this definition, Celālzāde aimed to demonstrate that the provision of justice could only be ensured by the absolute rule of the sultan. Celālzāde's formulation differed from the conceptualisation of justice as the observance of traditional laws and social order, which implied limits on sultanic absolutism. Although Celālzāde's formulation did not exclude the traditional conceptualisation of justice, the observance of laws was regarded as a responsibility of state officials instead of the sultan.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[427]
    [427]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441
  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442
  • Thumbnail: Page 
443
    443
  • Thumbnail: Page 
444
    444
  • Thumbnail: Page 
445
    445