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Platonic Bias in der Sozialtheorie: Über den Begriff des Handelns bei Hannah Arendt und eine philosophische Kritik an der soziologischen Praxistheorie

Takemitsu Morikawa
ARSP: Archiv für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie / Archives for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy
Vol. 96, No. 4 (2010), pp. 498-515
Published by: Franz Steiner Verlag
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23680910
Page Count: 18
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Platonic Bias in der Sozialtheorie: Über den Begriff des Handelns bei Hannah Arendt und eine philosophische Kritik an der soziologischen Praxistheorie
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Abstract

Although Hannah Arendt distinguishes three human activities from each other in Human Condition — labor, work and action — they are supposed not to be three different types of human activities but to be three different aspects of human activity. Assuming this to be the case, this paper demonstrates that social theory has not enough taken action in the sense of Arendt into account, even modern scholars such as Bourdieu, but it has continued to remain almost always on the level of work because of its concept of time. The second question is what consequence social theory may draw, if this aspect of human activity is recognized as essential and its concept of time changed. One answer proposed by the author is the sociology of forgiveness even though it has not been treated as a subject for modern sociology.

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