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Welfare and Child Care: The Intricacies of Competing Social Values

Jill Duerr Berrick
Social Work
Vol. 36, No. 4 (July 1991), pp. 345-351
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23715476
Page Count: 7
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Welfare and Child Care: The Intricacies of Competing Social Values
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Abstract

Welfare reform has been a subject of heated debate for years. The Family Support Act of 1988 is the latest attempt at overhauling the American welfare system. The act represents a significant departure, both programmatically and philosophically, from the original intent of such welfare programs as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). The early approach encouraged women to remain at home and raise their children, but the emphasis is now on moving adult welfare recipients into the labor market. This article provides a brief historical development of AFDC, along with specific policy recommendations that address the child care needs of the working AFDC population.

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