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Questions of Racial Diversity and Mentorship: An Empirical Exploration

Pauline M. Collins, Hugo A. Kamya and Robbie W. Tourse
Social Work
Vol. 42, No. 2 (March 1997), pp. 145-152
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23717313
Page Count: 8
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Questions of Racial Diversity and Mentorship: An Empirical Exploration
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Abstract

Social workers of all colors are needed to better serve an increasingly diverse client population. This study surveyed 430 social workers to explore their views on their mentor relationships and racial diversity. Race was not found to be significantly related to whether they had been mentored. Mentorship was prevalent among social workers from all racial groups, and some of these relationships crossed racial lines. However, the significant association between the race of protégés and their mentors suggests that a strong bias prevails toward "like mentoring like," or same-race relationships.

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