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Practice Wisdom

Waldo C. Klein and Martin Bloom
Social Work
Vol. 40, No. 6 (November 1995), pp. 799-807
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23718273
Page Count: 9
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Practice Wisdom
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Abstract

Practice wisdom is reconceptualized as an integrating vehicle for combining the strengths and minimizing the limitations of both the "objective," or empirical, practice model and the "subjective," or intuitive—phenomenological, practice model in the development of efficacious knowledge in social work. Practice wisdom is defined as a personal and value-driven system of knowledge that emerges out of the transaction between the phenomenological experience of the client situation and the use of scientific information. The result of this transaction is tentative, often unarticulated knowledge that forms the basis for on-the-spot practice hypotheses that enable progress to be made on a case in the absence of fully tested methods. Feedback from these practice hypotheses both strengthens practice skills and contributes to the articulation of knowledge in standard forms such as evaluation and theory development.

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