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Qualifications frameworks and their conflicting social imaginaries of globalisation

LAURA LOUISE SARAUW
Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences
Vol. 5, No. 3, SPECIAL ISSUE: Higher Education Gone Global (Winter 2012), pp. 22-38
Published by: Berghahn Books
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23744922
Page Count: 17
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Abstract

Critics often see the European Bologna Process as a univocal standardisation of higher education. By exploring how different qualifications frameworks project different social imaginaries of globalisation, this article takes a different stance. The overarching qualifications framework of the Bologna Process rests on a socially constituted and contested concept of globalisation as a change towards a more diverse and unforeseeable world, which calls for the development of flexible, lifelong learners with a broad knowledge base and strong democratic competencies. Although this social imaginary is widely known, I argue that it is also highly contested. For example, the Danish qualifications framework of 2003 projects a social imaginary of globalisation as a change towards a smaller and more predictable world, which enables a novel and more efficient alignment of the curriculum towards specific professional needs, and where the development of a broad knowledge base and democratic competencies are no longer prioritised.

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