Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

TRANSFORMED BY TECHNOLOGY? THE CHANGING NATURE OF WOMEN'S 'TRADITIONAL' AND 'NON-TRADITIONAL' WHITE-COLLAR WORK

Karen D. Hughes
Work, Employment & Society
Vol. 10, No. 2, TECHNOLOGY, MANAGEMENT AND GENDER (JUNE 1996), pp. 227-250
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23746600
Page Count: 24
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
TRANSFORMED BY TECHNOLOGY? THE CHANGING NATURE OF WOMEN'S 'TRADITIONAL' AND 'NON-TRADITIONAL' WHITE-COLLAR WORK
Preview not available

Abstract

This article contributes to debates on gender and technology by examining how women's white-collar work is being reshaped in the financial and business service sectors in Canada. These sectors are of distinct interest given their growing use of 'second wave' technologies which aim at 're-engineering' traditional work flows. The article examines the gendered dimensions of such change, focusing particularly on the potential of new technologies to reshape task divisions, and job content, which have long been structured along specific gender and occupational lines. Case studies are used to examine how women's work is being transformed in 'traditional' areas, such as secretarial work, as well as 'non-traditional' areas in para-legal work and insurance sales. The findings show that there has been a blurring of task divisions between clerical/non-clerical and female/male work, with women experiencing diverse consequences depending on their occupational location. The article illustrates the complexity of current processes of technological change and the importance of tracing out interconnections between different forms of white-collar labour.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[227]
    [227]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250