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Systematic Botany: Science to Develop Language Facility

Carolyn G. Carter
Annals of Dyslexia
Vol. 40 (1990), pp. 97-106
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23769435
Page Count: 10
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Systematic Botany: Science to Develop Language Facility
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Abstract

Classification is a fundamental skill that impacts on our abilities to read and to write text. The structure and sequence inherent in the science of taxonomy can be used as the basis for instruction in reading comprehension and in writing. The use of concrete, readily manipulated materials enhances vocabulary development by allowing the teacher to label objects and processes as the student experiences them. There are numerous activities which can be employed to enrich experiential learning; these can be directly related to reading and writing exercises. Processes learned with simple materials can be generalized to more abstract content as the students' proficiency improves. The instructor can control the level of difficulty of the class by writing or selecting materials appropriate to the skills levels of the students involved. Language facility is developed as students progress from the known to the less well known in a series of carefully constructed steps.

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