Why China Has No Science--An Interpretation of the History and Consequences of Chinese Philosophy

Yu-Lan Fung
International Journal of Ethics
Vol. 32, No. 3 (Apr., 1922), pp. 237-263
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2377487
Page Count: 27
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Why China Has No Science--An Interpretation of the History and Consequences of Chinese Philosophy
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Notes and References

This item contains 41 references.

[Footnotes]
  • 2
    The New Republic, Vol. XXV, 1920, New York, p. 188.
  • 3
    H. A. Giles' translation in his book, Chuang Tsu, Mystic, Moralist, and Social Re- former. London, 1889, p. 211.
  • 4
    Chinese Classics, second ed., London, 1895, Vol. II, pp. 282-83.
  • 5
    Chinese Classics, Vol. II, pp. 464-465
  • 7
    Chuang Tsu, etc., pp. 1-2
  • 8
    Giles' Chuang Tsu, etc., p. 101
  • 10
    Giles' Chuang Tsu etc., p. 167
  • 11
    Lionel Giles: The Sayings of Lao Tsu, p. 44
  • 12
    Ibid., p. 38.
  • 13
    James Legge: The Texts of Taoism (in the Sacred Books of the East series). London, 1891, Pt. I, p. 70.
  • 14
    Ibid., p. 38.
  • 15
    "The Great Master," Giles' James Legge's Texts of Taoism, Pt. I, p. 249.
  • 16
    Ibid., p. 198.
  • 17
    Lionel Giles: The Sayings of Lao Tsu, p. 44
  • 18
    James Legge: The Texts of Taoism, Pt. I, p. 90.
  • 19
    H. A. Giles: Chuang Tsu, etc., p. 20
  • 22
    Chinese Classics, Vol. II, pp. 108-111
  • 27
    Ibid., second chapter.
  • 30
    "The Elimination of Blindness" in the work of Suen Tse
  • 33
    James Legge: Chinese Classics, Vol. II, p. 371.
  • 34
    James Legge: Chinese Classics, Vol. II, p. 476.
  • 35
    Ibid., p. 427.
  • 36
    Ibid., pp. 258-259
  • 37
    James Legge: Chinese Classics, Vol. II, pp. 406-407.
  • 38
    Ibid., p. 490.
  • 39
    Ibid., pp. 203-204.
  • 40
    Ibid. p. 497.
  • 41
    Ibid., p. 156.
  • 42
    James Legge: Chinese Classics, Vol. I, pp. 266-267.
  • 43
    Ibid., p. 256.
  • 44
    Ibid., p. 253.
  • 45
    Ibid., Vol. II, p. 450.
  • 46
    James Legge: Chinese Classics, Vol. I, pp. 448-449
  • 47
    Ibid., Vol. II, pp. 450-451.
  • 48
    James Legge: Texts of Taoism, Pt. II, pp. 218-219.
  • 49
    "The Elimination of Blindness" in the work of Suen Tse
  • 50
    "On Nature" in the work of Suen Tse
  • 51
    James Legge: Chinese Classics, Vol. I, pp. 356-358
  • 52
    H. Bergson: Mind Energy; Translated by H. W. Carr; New York, 1920, p. 102.
  • 53
    Marcus Aurelius Antoninus: To Himself; translated by G. H. Rendall; London, 1910. I, 17, p. 9.
  • 54
    Ibid., II, 13, p. 15.