Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

FAMILY, PEER, AND ACCULTURATIVE CORRELATES OF PROSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AMONG LATINOS

Maria Rosario T. de Guzman and Gustavo Carlo
Great Plains Research
Vol. 14, No. 2, NEW IMMIGRANTS IN THE GREAT PLAINS: STRENGTHS AND CHALLENGES (Fall 2004), pp. 185-202
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23779477
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
FAMILY, PEER, AND ACCULTURATIVE CORRELATES OF PROSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AMONG LATINOS
Preview not available

Abstract

The present study was designed to examine the roles of family cohesion and adaptability, parent and peer attachment, and acculturation in predicting prosocial behavior tendencies in Latino adolescents from Nebraska. A total of 63 Latinos (M age = 14.52 years) from Lincoln, NE, completed measures of acculturation, parent and peer attachment, family adaptability and cohesion, and tendencies to perform prosocial behaviors. Results of a series of multiple regression analyses suggest that acculturation negatively predicted prosocial behavior tendencies (i.e., the higher the level of acculturation, the lower the tendency to perform prosocial acts). Peer but not parent attachment, and family adaptability but not cohesion, positively predicted prosocial tendencies. Discussion focuses on the integral roles that parents and peers play in healthy social development of Latino youth, and in the importance of incorporating culture into current models of prosocial development.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202