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MILLET-SOYABEAN INTERCROPPING AS AFFECTED BY DIFFERENT SOWING DATES OF SOYABEAN IN A SEMI-ARID ENVIRONMENT

P. E. Odo and K. N. Futuless
Cereal Research Communications
Vol. 28, No. 1/2 (2000), pp. 153-160
Published by: Akadémiai Kiadó
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23786057
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
MILLET-SOYABEAN INTERCROPPING AS AFFECTED BY DIFFERENT SOWING DATES OF SOYABEAN IN A SEMI-ARID ENVIRONMENT
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Abstract

Field trials were conducted in a semi-arid environment at Maiduguri to evaluate the effect of different sowing dates of soyabean on growth and yield of millet-soyabean intercrop. The crops were grown on a sandy loam soil in alternate single rows typical of the husbandry practices of the area. Results indicate that different sowing dates of soyabean and cropping system affected the growth and yield of soyabean more than that of millet. Early planted soyabean yielded better than late sown soyabean although the effect of soyabean on the growth of millet was not significant (p<0.05). The land equivalent ratio (LER) for millet-soyabean intercrops were mostly greater than 1.00 indicating that the mixtures were biologically more efficient than their pure stands. Millet intercropped with soyabean gave the highest land use efficiency with early sowing dates. The implication of these findings for agriculture is that short term grown soyabean can be introduced into the cropping system to diversify and increase the present scope of the crops grown without adversely diminishing the yield of the traditionally grown millet crop. The possibility of soyabean in the cropping system can also be used to break the cycle of parasitic weed, striga when soyabean substitutes cowpea occasionally.

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