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ON THE ETIOLOGY OF FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT OF WHEAT IN SOUTH GERMANY - PRECEDING CROPS, WEATHER CONDITIONS FOR INOCULUM PRODUCTION AND HEAD INFECTION, PRONENESS OF THE CROP TO INFECTION AND MYCOTOXIN PRODUCTION

A. OBST, J. LEPSCHY-VON GLEISSENTHALL and R. BECK
Cereal Research Communications
Vol. 25, No. 3, PROCEEDINGS of the 5TH EUROPEAN FUSARIUM SEMINAR Szeged, Hungary August 29 - September 5 1997 Part 2 (1997), pp. 699-703
Published by: Akadémiai Kiadó
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23786850
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
ON THE ETIOLOGY OF FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT OF WHEAT IN SOUTH GERMANY - PRECEDING CROPS, WEATHER CONDITIONS FOR INOCULUM PRODUCTION AND HEAD INFECTION, PRONENESS OF THE CROP TO INFECTION AND MYCOTOXIN PRODUCTION
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Abstract

During the last five years in Bavaria more than 1600 wheat samples have been investigated for their content of F. graminearum propagules and the most common toxin deoxynivalenol (DON). The Fusarium risk is classified according to critical weather conditions for the primary infection of wheat ears as well as for agronomic aspects such as preceding crop, tillage system and cultivar resistance.

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