Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Evaluation of CERES-Rice Model (V. 4.0) Under Temperate Conditions of Kashmir Valley, India

H. Singh, K.N. Singh and B. Hasan
Cereal Research Communications
Vol. 35, No. 4 (December 2007), pp. 1723-1732
Published by: Akadémiai Kiadó
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23789926
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Evaluation of CERES-Rice Model (V. 4.0) Under Temperate Conditions of Kashmir Valley, India
Preview not available

Abstract

The CERES-rice model (version 4.0) was calibrated and validated using the data from a field experiment carried out during the rainy season of 2004 and 2005 at Shalimar, Srinagar (35° 5' N latitude and 74° 89' E longitude, 1587 m above the mean sea level, India. The experiment included six rice cultivars each transplanted on 25 May, 10 June and 25 June. Data of 25 May transplanting was used for model calibration and development of the genetic coefficients of the rice cultivars. The predicted and observed dates of phenological events were in close agreement with root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and D-index of 5.0 days, 4.3 days and 0.91, respectively, for anthesis and 3.7 days, 3.1 days and 0.91, respectively, for physiological maturity of the crop. The predicted and observed grain yields were also very close with a RMSE of 0.63 Mg ha−1, MAE of 0.58 Mg ha−1 and D-index of 0.89, respectively. Corresponding values for above ground biomass was 1.17 Mg ha−1, 1.01 Mg ha− and 0.82. Sensitivity test showed that simulated yield responded to temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration. Nitrogen 240 kg ha−1 at 25 May transplanting, recorded highest simulated grain yield (9.71 Mg ha−1). Further, 3 seedlings hill−1 produced highest simulated grain yield. The results suggest that the model can be applied in the temperate Kashmir to estimate crop productivity and optimize the management practices.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1723]
    [1723]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1724
    1724
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1725
    1725
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1726
    1726
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1727
    1727
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1728
    1728
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1729
    1729
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1730
    1730
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1731
    1731
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1732
    1732