Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Consumer Complaining and Community Involvement: An Exploration of Their Theoretical and Empirical Linkages

REX H. WARLAND, ROBERT O. HERRMANN and DAN E. MOORE
The Journal of Consumer Affairs
Vol. 18, No. 1 (Summer 1984), pp. 64-78
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23859459
Page Count: 15
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Consumer Complaining and Community Involvement: An Exploration of Their Theoretical and Empirical Linkages
Preview not available

Abstract

Drawing upon Smith's [16] participation theory, it is proposed that consumers who complain are also very likely to be active in other areas of social, economic and political life. The relationship between consumer complaining behavior and political and citizen participation is investigated in this paper. Using data from a 1980 survey of Pennsylvania adults, it was found that complaining behavior was significantly related to community involvement in a multivariate analysis in which other key variables were controlled. Implications are explored for both consumer education and the study of consumer complaining behavior.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78