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Journal Article

Trophy Hunting and Wildlife Conservation in Zambia

Dale M. Lewis and Peter Alpert
Conservation Biology
Vol. 11, No. 1 (Feb., 1997), pp. 59-68
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2387276
Page Count: 10
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Trophy Hunting and Wildlife Conservation in Zambia
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Abstract

For wildlife conservation to succeed in developing countries, people who live in or near protected areas must receive benefits that offset the costs of their reduced access to natural resources. International trophy hunting is currently generating significant economic benefits for residents of game management areas in Zambia. This has been made possible through a revolving fund and an administrative program that direct revenues from trophy hunting to local wildlife management and community development projects. Benefits might be enhanced by better biological information for management, greater local participation in the allocation and operation of hunting concessions, and the promotion of ecological and ethical standards for trophy hunting. An international system of certification for trophy hunting operations could foster these improvements.

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