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HISTORICAL ASPECTS OF THE ORIGIN AND DISTRIBUTION OF TAGASASTE (CHAMAECYTISUS PROLIFERUS (L. FIL.) LINK SSP. PALMENSIS (CHRIST) KUNKEL), A FODDER TREE FROM THE CANARY ISLANDS

J. Francisco-Ortega, M.T. Jackson, A. Santos-Guerra and M. Fernández-Galván
Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Garden
Vol. 14, No. 1 (9 December, 1991), pp. 67-76
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23874430
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
HISTORICAL ASPECTS OF THE ORIGIN AND DISTRIBUTION OF TAGASASTE (CHAMAECYTISUS PROLIFERUS (L. FIL.) LINK SSP. PALMENSIS (CHRIST) KUNKEL), A FODDER TREE FROM THE CANARY ISLANDS
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Abstract

Chamaecytisus proliferus (L. fil.)Link (Fabaceae: Genisteae) forms a taxonomic complex which is endemic to El Hierro, La Palma, La Gomera, Tenerife and Gran Canaria in the Canary Island archipelago. Forms from La Palma are popularly known as "tagasaste" whereas those from the rest of the archipelago are commonly called "escobón". Tagasaste is the only form which is broadly cultivated in the Canary Islands, and since the late 19th century in New Zealand and Australia. It has also become naturalized in Australia (South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania), Java, the Hawaiian Islands, California, Portugal, North Africa, Kenya, Tanzania and South Africa. Dr Victor Pérez, a medical practitioner from La Palma, introduced tagasaste as a fodder tree from La Palma to Tenerife by the middle 19th century. Early introductions of tagasaste from the Canary Islands in the Pacific region confirm the importance of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and the Botanic Gardens of Adelaide in the distribution of this exotic species in this region during the last century.

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