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Effects of Minimal Versus Lengthy Delay Between Simulated and In Vivo Instruction on Community Performance

John Nietupski, Patrick Clancy, Liz Wehrmacher and Connie Parmer
Education and Training of the Mentally Retarded
Vol. 20, No. 3 (September 1985), pp. 190-195
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23877351
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Minimal Versus Lengthy Delay Between Simulated and In Vivo Instruction on Community Performance
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Abstract

A combination multiple probe and alternating treatments design was employed to determine the effects of the timing of simulated training, relative to in vivo training, on the community fast food restaurant performance of two students with severe handicaps. The results indicated no differential effects of simulation immediately prior to, versus 1½ hour prior to, in vivo instruction. Maintenance data suggested skill retention as much as seven weeks following program completion.

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