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Teaching Elementary Students with Cognitive Disabilities Food Preparation Skills While Embedding Instructive Feedback in the Prompt and Consequent Event

Renee Schmitz Fiscus, John W. Schuster, Timothy E. Morse and Belva C. Collins
Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities
Vol. 37, No. 1 (March 2002), pp. 55-69
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23879583
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Teaching Elementary Students with Cognitive Disabilities Food Preparation Skills While Embedding Instructive Feedback in the Prompt and Consequent Event
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Abstract

This study investigated whether students with moderate to severe cognitive disabilities would acquire related instructive feedback stimuli embedded in the prompt and consequent event, as well as unrelated instructive feedback stimuli that was delivered in the consequent event. The trainer used constant time delay to teach three food preparation skills (i.e., making cheese and crackers, waffles with syrup, and chocolate milk) to 4 elementary students, and instructive feedback stimuli were embedded within this procedure. Results indicate that constant time delay was effective in teaching 3 of the 4 students all three food preparation skills, and that 3 of the 4 students acquired some of the related instructive feedback stimuli. Three of the four students acquired 100% of the unrelated instructive feedback stimuli while the fourth student acquired 80% of this material.

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