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Aggressive Interaction Between Howler Monkeys and Turkey Vultures: The Need to Thermoregulate Behaviorally

O. P. Young
Biotropica
Vol. 14, No. 3 (Sep., 1982), pp. 228-231
DOI: 10.2307/2388029
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388029
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Aggressive Interaction Between Howler Monkeys and Turkey Vultures: The Need to Thermoregulate Behaviorally
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Abstract

On Barro Colorado Island, Panama, conflict occasionally occurs between Turkey Vultures and Howler Monkeys, apparently for choice early-morning sunning sites. Vultures have previously been documented to require early-morning solar radiation to facilitate feather-drying and/or elevation of body temperatures. No such mechanisms have been documented as necessary for Howler Monkeys. A hypothesis is presented suggesting that behavioral thermoregulation in howlers is a required part of the general strategy of utilizing an energy-poor diet. Heat obtained from solar radiation may reduce demands on metabolic energy for maintaining proper body temperatures and increase the efficiency of digestive fermentation.

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