Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Food-Foraging Behavior of Male Euglossini (Hymenoptera: Apidae): Vagabonds or Trapliners?

James D. Ackerman, Michael R. Mesler, Karen L. Lu and Arlee M. Montalvo
Biotropica
Vol. 14, No. 4 (Dec., 1982), pp. 241-248
DOI: 10.2307/2388080
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388080
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Food-Foraging Behavior of Male Euglossini (Hymenoptera: Apidae): Vagabonds or Trapliners?
Preview not available

Abstract

The nectar-foraging behavior of male euglossine bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) was studied at a population of Calathea latifolia (Marantaceae) on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, for two weeks. Several marked males of Exuerete smaragdina and Euglossa imperialis foraged at C. latifolia on a daily basis. Immigration rates were low, and the site fidelity of bees was high. Selection of inflorescences by the marked individuals was not random. The bees learned specific locations of inflorescences at which they consistently foraged and ignored nearby inflorescences. However, not all inflorescences in a bee's repertoire were included in each foraging bout. The sequence of inflorescences visited was not the same within or between days nor were the foraging routes uni-directional. Foraging bouts of both male and female bees did not conform to rigid time schedules. Thus, male euglossine bees are not necessarily as transient and vagabond as previously portrayed. Those males that are site-constant forage in a fashion reminiscent of the traplining behavior once described for females. We propose that euglossine bees change their foraging habits as shifts in resource availability and dispersion occur.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248