Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

White-Sand Vegetation of Brazilian Amazonia

Anthony B. Anderson
Biotropica
Vol. 13, No. 3 (Sep., 1981), pp. 199-210
DOI: 10.2307/2388125
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388125
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
White-Sand Vegetation of Brazilian Amazonia
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper describes a distinctive vegetation type occurring on white-sand soils which are scattered throughout the Amazon region. Although essentially homologous throughout Amazonia, white-sand vegetation is known locally by various terms: to avoid confusion, exclusive use of the single term "Amazon caatinga" is proposed. The Amazon caatinga is distinguished from other regional vegetation types by its white-sand soil, scleromorphic physiognomy, and unusual floristic composition. Possible origins of the white-sand soil include: in-situ weathering, alluvial deposition, or podzolization. The scleromorphic physiognomy of the caatinga indicates a lack of nutrients and/or periodic water deficiencies in the soil. Extreme edaphic conditions and the insularity of these sites have probably acted as powerful selective forces, generating a biota characteristically low in diversity and high in endemism. Numerous endemic species may currently face extinction due to wide-spread burning of caatinga vegetation. Repeated fires on white-sand sites result in the effective arrest of succession; subsequent mining of these sites for sand eliminates any possibility of vegetational reestablishment. Alternative benefits of the Amazon caatinga in its intact state are considered.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210