Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Double- and Single-Seeded Indehiscent Legumes of Platypodium elegans: Consequences for Wind Dispersal and Seedling Growth and Survival

Carol K. Augspurger
Biotropica
Vol. 18, No. 1 (Mar., 1986), pp. 45-50
DOI: 10.2307/2388361
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388361
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Double- and Single-Seeded Indehiscent Legumes of Platypodium elegans: Consequences for Wind Dispersal and Seedling Growth and Survival
Preview not available

Abstract

The tropical tree, Platypodium elegans (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae), matures indehiscent wind-dispersed fruits containing one or, much less commonly, two seeds. Relative to single-seeded fruits, double-seeded fruits have greater wet mass, area, wing-loading, and rate of descent in still air, and consequently are dispersed shorter distances under field conditions. The proximal seed of double-seeded fruits has a smaller dry mass and usually has lower and slower germination than the distal seed. Its radicle has difficulty emerging from the legume and establishing a root system, and the seedling has lower survival and slower growth. Twin seedlings arising from one fruit grow more slowly than single seedlings from double- or single-seeded fruits, and both twins rarely survive to one year under growing house conditions. In fruit samples of equal size, more total seedlings emerge from double- than single-seeded fruits; however, due to their lower probability of survival, double-seeded fruits have no more seedlings at one year under growing house conditions than do single-seeded fruits. Seed predation was not measured in this study. Unless multiseeded fruits more easily escape seed predation, there is no apparent evolutionary advantage to a parent of P. elegans producing multiseeded fruits. Their presence in low numbers appears to result from incomplete elimination or suppression of development of the multiple ovules after pollination.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50