Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Influence of Aggressive Ants on Fruit Removal in the Tropical Tree, Ficus capensis (Moraceae)

Donald W. Thomas
Biotropica
Vol. 20, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 49-53
DOI: 10.2307/2388425
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388425
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Influence of Aggressive Ants on Fruit Removal in the Tropical Tree, Ficus capensis (Moraceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

This study examined the effect of aggressive arboreal weaver ants (Oecophylla longinoda) on the dispersal of fruits from the African fig, Ficus capensis. Compared with trees having no or few O. longinoda, trees with large ant colonies had reduced levels of nocturnal fruit removal and an increased proportion of fruits that fell undispersed. Diurnal fruit removal did not differ significantly between trees with different densities of ants. This shift in fruit dispersal characteristics resulted from the clustering of aggressive O. longinoda on the fruiting rama at night. Although ant-plant mutualisms are commonly thought to have evolved from the enhanced fitness that aggressive ants confer on occupied trees by reducing herbivory or competition, reduced seed dispersal in zoochoric species may be an important evolutionary block.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53