Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Australian Rock-Mammals: A Phenomenon of the Seasonally Dry Tropics

W. J. Freeland, J. W. Winter and S. Raskin
Biotropica
Vol. 20, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 70-79
DOI: 10.2307/2388428
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388428
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Australian Rock-Mammals: A Phenomenon of the Seasonally Dry Tropics
Preview not available

Abstract

Mammal species specializing on rocky habitats constitute 11 percent of Australia's marsupial and rodent species. The majority of rock-dwelling species is limited to the seasonally dry tropics. These habitats experience a single wet season followed by a long dry season. Runoff from rocky escarpments, water absorption by large rock formations, and the presence of aquifers in rock result in greater water availability close to rock escarpments. Escarpment vegetation, therefore, is higher in species richness and plant productivity than the surrounding forested habitaat. These species-rich habitats provide a greater variety of potential foods for hebivores. The impact of large rock formations on surrounding vegetation is less marked in regions with a more evenly distributed or very low rainfall and/or a temperate climate. The impact of rock escarpments on vegetation in the seasonally dry tropics, rather than the existence of more opportunities for speciation via genetic isolation, is likely to have been instrumental in the evolution of the often regionally endemic rock faunas of Australia's dry tropics.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79