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Evidence for the Successional Status of Liana Forest (Xingu River Basin, Amazonian Brazil)

William Balee and David G. Campbell
Biotropica
Vol. 22, No. 1 (Mar., 1990), pp. 36-47
DOI: 10.2307/2388717
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388717
Page Count: 12
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Evidence for the Successional Status of Liana Forest (Xingu River Basin, Amazonian Brazil)
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Abstract

Quantitative inventories of two narrowly-rectangular plots of terra firme Amazonian rainforest were conducted in the habitats of the Arawete and Asurini Indians, respectively The samples included all trees with a dbh of $\geq 10$ cm. Relative density, frequency, and dominance are presented for the 20 most important tree species on each plot; species and family importance values are also presented. The Arawete plot had 441 individuals, 142 species, and a total basal area of 22.10 m$^2$; the Asurini plot had 464 individuals, 137 species, and a basal area of 21.90 m$^2$ The data suggest that both plots are parcels of a single forest type that conforms to the criteria for Amazonian liana forest. Many of the species on the plots, such as Orbignya phalerata. Theobroma speciosum, Maximiliana maripa and Bertholletia excelsa, are disturbance indicators in the eastern Amazon. This, and the presence near both sites of Indian black earth (terra preta do indio), suggest that much of these forests may have been felled and burned for shifting cultivation at least once in the past.

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