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Description and Evaluation of the Job Designs Project for Adolescents and Young Adults with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

Michael Bullis, H. D. Bud Fredericks, Constance Lehman, Kathleen Paris, Janet Corbitt and Brian Johnson
Behavioral Disorders
Vol. 19, No. 4 (August 1994), pp. 254-268
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23887526
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Description and Evaluation of the Job Designs Project for Adolescents and Young Adults with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders
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Abstract

This article describes the Job Designs Project, a 3-year model demonstration effort that provided vocational services to adolescents and young adults with emotional or behavioral disorders. Vocational trainers offered job placement, training, and support to the participants. Of the 58 participants, 46 (79%) secured competitive work and 17 of the 46 were placed in multiple job placements, resulting in a total of 78 competitive jobs. Of the 78 jobs, 51 (65%) ended successfully (e.g., the worker quit the job appropriately) and 27 (35%) ended unsuccessfully (e.g., termination or the worker quit inappropriately). A total of 17 (37%) workers were fired from jobs and 28 (61%) were fired or quit a job inappropriately. Correlational analyses revealed that four variables were associated with program success or failure: history of alcohol/substance abuse, history of running away from residential placements, use of alcohol/substances while in the program, and social problems with work supervisors and/or co-workers. Surveys of the employers who hired a worker from Job Designs indicated that they were favorably impressed with the project and its staff. Participants interviewed at exit from the program reported that, overall, they were satisfied with their own program experiences. Drawing from these results and experiences, suggestions are made for conducting effective vocational programs for this population and for future research.

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