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Receptive Nonverbal Processing Ability and Locus of Control Orientation in Children and Adolescents with Conduct Disorders

Kirsten Strand and Stephen Nowicki Jr.
Behavioral Disorders
Vol. 24, No. 2 (February 1999), pp. 102-108
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23888749
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Receptive Nonverbal Processing Ability and Locus of Control Orientation in Children and Adolescents with Conduct Disorders
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Abstract

This study examined whether children and adolescents who are diagnosed as having conduct disorders (CD) would perform more poorly on tests of receptive nonverbal processing skill and would be more externally controlled than their peers without CD who were matched with them on age, race, sex, IQ, and socioeconomic status. The study also examined the effect of age on performance. Participants completed the Diagnostic Analysis of Nonverbal Accuracy (DANVA, Nowicki, & Duke, 1994) and a locus of control scale. Analyses of results showed that children and adolescents with CD were less accurate than their peers without CD in identifying affect in adult facial expressions and children's tones of voice. Moreover, adolescents without CD were found to be more accurate than both children and adolescents with CD and children without CD in identifying affect presented by child facial expressions, child gestures, and adult postures. Finally, adolescents with CD were more externally controlled than their peers without CD. The results are discussed within the framework of relationship development.

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