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Stem Allometry in a North Queensland Tropical Rainforest

Jeff W. Claussen and Colin R. Maycock
Biotropica
Vol. 27, No. 4 (Dec., 1995), pp. 421-426
DOI: 10.2307/2388953
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2388953
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Stem Allometry in a North Queensland Tropical Rainforest
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Abstract

The stem allometry (tree height versus stem diameter) of four tree species found in a North Queensland rainforest was examined. These species were dicotyledonous trees, two of which were classed as early successional species and two as later successional species. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in the stem allometry of dicotyledonous trees of the same successional status. However, significant differences (P < 0.05) in stem allometry were found when comparing species of different successional status. Later successional species, but not early successional species, were found to be "elastically similar" to a theoretical buckling limit. The relationship between stability safety factors and tree height indicated that both early and later successional species have large buckling safety margins when of low stature. At medium statures (subcanopy), early successional species display a moderate buckling safety margin while later successional species exhibited their lowest buckling safety margin. At tall statures (canopy and above), early successional species exhibited their lowest buckling safety margin while later successional species had moderate buckling safety margins. Stem allometry may be influenced by a tree's life-span, wood density, and environmental conditions in its crown region.

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