Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Equal recognition, consolidation or familiarization? The language rights debate in the context of the minority of Western Thrace in Greece

KATERINA MANTOUVALOU
Ethnicities
Vol. 9, No. 4 (December 2009), pp. 477-506
Published by: Sage Publications, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23890622
Page Count: 30
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

A number of theorists have tried to determine how liberal states should respond to the language recognition claims made by minority groups. Liberal multiculturalists defend the 'equal recognition' of minority and majority languages, liberal neutralists advance the 'consolidation' of a single unified language, and democratic liberals argue for 'familiarization' of the majority and the minority population as the fairest response to the groups' claim. In this article, I illustrate and test these responses with the case of the Muslim minority of Western Thrace, a group that has resided in Greece since Ottoman times and has been the subject of competitive Greek and Turkish relations. Contextual analysis in this article will show that when minority groups are part of antagonistic interstate relations, a priori individual and collective rights approaches cannot ensure that their members are treated fairly. I argue that familiarization of linguistically diverse group members provides the fairest response to the claims of linguistic minorities. This is grounded on the democratic ideal of participation in common institutions under conditions of non-domination.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[477]
    [477]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
478
    478
  • Thumbnail: Page 
479
    479
  • Thumbnail: Page 
480
    480
  • Thumbnail: Page 
481
    481
  • Thumbnail: Page 
482
    482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
488
    488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
489
    489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
490
    490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
491
    491
  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492
  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494
  • Thumbnail: Page 
495
    495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
496
    496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
497
    497
  • Thumbnail: Page 
498
    498
  • Thumbnail: Page 
499
    499
  • Thumbnail: Page 
500
    500
  • Thumbnail: Page 
501
    501
  • Thumbnail: Page 
502
    502
  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506