Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Ecology of Twig-Dwelling Ants in a Wet Lowland Tropical Forest

M. M. Byrne
Biotropica
Vol. 26, No. 1 (Mar., 1994), pp. 61-72
DOI: 10.2307/2389111
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389111
Page Count: 12
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecology of Twig-Dwelling Ants in a Wet Lowland Tropical Forest
Preview not available

Abstract

Ants of tropical wet forests are common, yet practically unstudied, despite their importance in nutrient cycling and seed bank dynamics. I investigated the ecology of a leaf litter assemblage of twig-dwelling ants in lowland tropical wet forest and contrasted it with the better known ecologies of ground- and tree-dwelling ants. Nest densities at La Selva. Costa Rica were high (7 48 nests/m2) and potential nest sites were abundant. Colonies moved frequently (residence times for species ranged from 35 to 146 days) from one twig nest to another, occupying a wide range of twig types. Experiments with artificial nests showed that colonization was not reduced by the presence of resident ant colonies. Queenright nests (in which at least one queen is present) and queenless workers, as well as dealate queens, colonized artificial nests. Activity times and diet composition did not differ between the two species with largest sample sizes; workers were active under most conditions. Despite their abundance, twig-dwelling ants are apparently limited neither by availability of nest sites nor food. Many of the 32 species found coexisting at La Selva may be limited by high mortality during alate dispersal or colony movement.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
Part of Sustainability