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Distribution of Malaria in Anolis Lizards of the Luquillo Forest, Puerto Rico: Implications for Host Community Ecology

Jos J. Schall and Stephen P. Vogt
Biotropica
Vol. 25, No. 2 (Jun., 1993), pp. 229-235
DOI: 10.2307/2389187
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389187
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Distribution of Malaria in Anolis Lizards of the Luquillo Forest, Puerto Rico: Implications for Host Community Ecology
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Abstract

Five species of Anolis lizards of the Luquillo forest, Puerto Rico were surveyed for infection with malarial parasites. Two species of parasite, Plasmodium floridense and P azurophilum. commonly infect Anolis gundlachi. P. azurophilum also very rarely infects A. stratulus, A. krugi. A. evermanni, and A. cristatellus. For A. gundlachi, males are more often infected, and percent of animals infected increases with body size, but percent infected decreases for the very largest body size class in males. P azurophilum is far more common than P floridense, and the two parasite species appear to associate randomly into mixed infections with no evidence for interspecific competition between malaria species. Infected A. gundlachi have a greater prevalence of injured tails. The five anole species differ by body size (three large and two small species) and habitat used (shady cool places vs sunny warmer locations). A. gundlachi and A. evermanni are the only species that are similar in size that are often found in the same locations. Malarial infection may mediate competition between these two species of lizards.

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