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Interactive Effects of Disturbance and Shade upon Colonization of Grassland: An Experiment with Anthriscus sylvestris (L.) Hoffm., Conium maculatum L., Daucus carota L. and Heracleum sphondylium L.

J. Silvertown and M. Tremlett
Functional Ecology
Vol. 3, No. 2 (1989), pp. 229-235
DOI: 10.2307/2389305
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389305
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Interactive Effects of Disturbance and Shade upon Colonization of Grassland: An Experiment with Anthriscus sylvestris (L.) Hoffm., Conium maculatum L., Daucus carota L. and Heracleum sphondylium L.
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Abstract

Seeds of four species of Umbelliferae [Anthriscus sylvestris (L.) Hoffm., Conium maculatum L. Daucus carota, L. and Heracleum sphondylium L.] were sown separately into plots of grassland given two types of disturbance treatment, factorially combined with shade in a 4 x 3 x 2 experimental design. All species showed some enhanced recruitment in response to disturbance, the effects of which were still significant 21 months after treatments were applied. The duration of the disturbance, which was different in the two treatments, affected the size and structure of populations at the end of the experiment. All significant effects of shade (but not disturbance) were accompanied by a first-order interaction. The effect of shade on colonization by the four species in this experiment varied with the occurrence of disturbance and its intensity, and varied significantly between species. It is suggested that differences between species in their habitat distributions will most often be due to differences in interactions between disturbance and other factors, rather than due to their response to disturbance alone.

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