Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Root Growth and Morphology of Carex Species as Influenced by Oxygen Deficiency

P. R. Moog and P. Janiesch
Functional Ecology
Vol. 4, No. 2 (1990), pp. 201-208
DOI: 10.2307/2389339
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389339
Page Count: 8
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Root Growth and Morphology of Carex Species as Influenced by Oxygen Deficiency
Preview not available

Abstract

The responses of Carex roots to anoxia were investigated in species which differ in their flooding tolerance. Forty days of oxygen deficiency induced several changes in root growth, morphology and anatomy in C. extensa Goodenough, C. remota L. and C. pseudocyperus L. Under anaerobic conditions C. extensa showed strong decreases in root biomass, number, average and total root length, and number of exocortex cell layers. Adventitious roots, intercellular space in the cortex, development of root hairs and lignin content of endodermis increased under these conditions. In C. remota, average and total root length were reduced, but total root biomass increased by 47%, due to greater root number, adventitious root formation and root thickness. The lignin content of endodermis and exodermis was enhanced. Under anaerobic conditions C. pseudocyperus showed a reduction of the adventitious roots by 25%, but all other measured root characteristics increased. These results indicate that tolerance to oxygen deficiency is associated with a number of adaptations to root morphology and anatomy, besides enhanced aerenchyma formation, and that it varies between species of different flooding tolerance.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208