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An Open Top Chamber for Field Studies of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Concentration on Saltmarsh Vegetation

B. G. Drake, P. W. Leadley, W. J. Arp, D. Nassiry and P. S. Curtis
Functional Ecology
Vol. 3, No. 3 (1989), pp. 363-371
DOI: 10.2307/2389377
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2389377
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
An Open Top Chamber for Field Studies of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Concentration on Saltmarsh Vegetation
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Abstract

Small open top chambers (0.8 m x 1.0 m) were developed to maintain elevated CO2 concentrations in three plant communities in a brackish marsh ecosystem. Mean annual CO2 concentrations were 350 ± 22 μ l l-1 in chambers which received no added CO2 and 686 ± 30 μ l l-1 in chambers with elevated CO2 concentrations. Light quality was not affected in the photosynthetically active wavelengths but the chamber reduced light quantity by 10%. Night-time air temperatures inside the chamber (Ti) averaged 2C above air temperature outside the chamber (To) due to heating from the air blowers. Air temperature profiles through the plant canopy and boundary layer showed that daytime temperature differences (Ti - To) were greater than night-time differences and this day/night difference also depended on the plant community. Effects of the chamber on the micro-environment of the plant communities resulted in a significant growth enhancement in the plant community dominated by the C3 sedge Scirpus olneyi Grey but not in the other two communities.

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